Christianity 201

January 16, 2017

On Speaking Things into Existence

As I grow older, one of the striking things about the distinctions between denominations is not the doctrinal beliefs per se, but rather the terminology used which differs from church to church. For many of you as well, the phrase speaking things into existence probably sounds like something you would hear in a Charismatic or Pentecostal context. The implied message in these congregations is that this is something we can do.

The origin of the phrase begins in Romans 4:17

As it is written: “I have made you a father of many nations.” He is our father in the sight of God, in whom he believed–the God who gives life to the dead and calls into being things that were not. (NIV)

On a forum at Biblical Hermenuetics the challenge is spelled out:

Rom 4:16-17:

That is why it depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his offspring — not only to the adherent of the law but also to the one who shares the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations” — in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist. (ESV)

This last part reads, in NA-28:

καλοῦντος τὰ μὴ ὄντα ὡς ὄντα

I’m having a hard time arriving at the English given above (which is consistent with most translations [but see below]), which seems to entail a reference to creation ex nihilo. The phrase is literally something like:

calling that which is not being as being

Unclear to me are both the meaning of καλέω (to call) is this context and the meaning of the ὡς + participle construction, which seems most often to indicate “as [if] being/doing X”.2 Interestingly, the KJV gives:

and calleth those things which be not as though they were.

While this English isn’t exceptionally clear, I at least understand how it relates to the Greek…

I decided to investigate this verse in various commentaries.

  • The NIV Study Bible reminds us that the context in Romans 4 is Abraham, and notes that the birth of Isaac is an example of God creating out of nothing.
  • The Evangelical Commentary on the Bible (p. 934) continues this theme. Paul “introduces the historical fact that God in his mysterious providence and testing kept Abraham and Sarah waiting for the fulfillment of the promise of a son until long after human conception and birth was physical possibility, thereby heightening the miracle of the event and the absolute necessity of faith. It was Abraham’s trust in God as true to his word in spite of appearances and the fact that he “was strengthened in his faith and gave glory to God.”
  • The Eerdman’s Bible Commentary (p. 1024) notes that the speaking things into existence is a divine attribute and that actually two are listed, the other being giving life to the dead. Clearly, this isn’t necessarily something we can do.
  • The International Bible Commentary (p. 1325) reminds us that God “can both renew life and issue his creative call.” There is a reference to Isaiah 41:4 “Who has performed and accomplished it, Calling forth the generations from the beginning? ‘I, the LORD, am the first, and with the last. I am He.'” (NASB)
  • The Wycliffe Bible Commentary (p. 1125) spends a little longer with this verse: “This is the Lord’s power to create. It could also easily be translated: God calls into being what does not exist as (easily as he calls) that which does exist. No mortal can comprehend the divine creative power. The bringing of animate and inanimate objects into existence and their maintenance is God’s activity . The nature of the objects may be discussed — mind, matter, energy — but the why and how of their existence can be known accurately only to the extent that the Lord reveals them.

At the website Heartland, we’re presented with a much longer Bible study on the subject of God speaking things into existence which focuses on three examples:

  1. Creation
  2. Sin (an interesting concept to consider; I had to read this one twice)
  3. Salvation

…So can we speak things into existence?

I started out by saying this verse gives birth to certain phrases commonly in use in certain types of churches. Please don’t get me wrong, I believe we are to ask God to increase our faith. I believe we are to pray in faith. I believe in a God of miracles. But I’m not sure its right to import particular words or expressions into situations they were never meant to address. It certainly sounds spiritual to speak of “speaking it into existence” but it might be misappropriation of that particular verse.

In a sermon this fall, Willow Creek Discipleship Director Rick Shurtz said, “If you have to speak it into existence you’re not trusting God, you’re playing God.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Comment »

  1. “Speaking into existence” is actually a misconception anyway. Many people say it with no intent to say that WE have such a power, but they think that it’s what Genesis meant to teach. No. What we have there is a case of the author being “shy” about stating his own actions (as also seen for example in the gospels by Mark and John) — and in the signature statement for the first section (compiled into Genesis by Moses) in Genesis 2:4, the Lord is cited as the author.

    The “Lord” was the pre-incarnate name for Jesus. Note that the term translated “God” in Genesis 1 refers to the Father, and that the Spirit is also mentioned. The third Person is the one who wrote the account (or perhaps dictated it to Adam or maybe even Moses).

    What Genesis 1 is doing is saying that the Lord (Jesus) was the Person of the Trinity through whom creation was done. Each “speaking” passage is the Lord recording for us what God’s will was, expressed to the Lord (and other context makes it clear the Lord then directed the Spirit, the primary divine active agent, which is probably why the Spirit’s role is silent as well after the brief early mention, and why God says let “us” create.

    Then, after the intent for what’s about to happen is stated, the action is left implied (because it is the author doing it), and then the action’s results are described. It isn’t saying that there’s some mystical power to the speaking. Rather, it is saying that the Person who focuses on being the divine representative to man, who authored the account (also a form of speaking), was the focus of creating.

    This is why John 1 says that Jesus is the Word and that creation was done through the Word.

    Note that either way, it is wrong to say that WE have a “power” to “speak things into existence” in any literal sense. But I assume that the people using that mean it in the sense of our being able to pray to God and if he grants it, he can make it happen. In the sense of a request, you could actually say that. But it’s still based on a misunderstanding of Genesis, so I wouldn’t advise it.

    Comment by Researcher — January 19, 2017 @ 2:06 am | Reply


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