Christianity 201

August 22, 2014

Are You “In The Faith”?

This is the devotional blog I write and some days that also comprises my personal devotions, but there is also Daily Encouragement, the devotional blog I read. A couple of days ago the theme verse was:

“Examine yourselves to see whether you are in the faith; test yourselves. Do you not realize that Christ Jesus is in you—unless, of course, you fail the test?” (2 Corinthians 13:5).

I thought there might be more to the phrase “in the faith” but that it also might be something that we do need to examine ourselves concerning, since some people who think they are “in” may justify their inclusion on religious premises instead of God’s grace.  Translations treat this phrase as follows:

  • you are holding to your faith and showing the proper fruits of it (AMP)
  • living the life of trust (CJB)
  • true to your faith (CEV)
  • still in the Christian faith (GW) (I thought the use of still was interesting here)
  • continuing in the faith (ISV) (see note above)
  • Are you really Christians? (Living Bible) (i.e. Did you ever cross the line of faith)
  • you are really believers (NIrV) (see not above)
  • faith is genuine (NLT)
  • you are solid in the faith (Message)

Bible translators try very hard to avoid doctrinal bias and just say what the text says, but there are three nuances presented above:

  1. The idea of a faith that is being lived out on a day-to-day, moment-by-moment basis; that the person is endeavoring the abide in Christ; that there is no pretense
  2. The idea (GW and ISV) that one can abandon the faith; or at the very least, not be walking in it as described in the previous instance
  3. The idea that some Corinthians reading Paul’s letter may be resting on a false conversion; perhaps trusting in works to save them

The Reformation Study Bible says of this passage (in reference to examination or testing):

Paul’s words help clarify the doctrine of assurance of faith. Paul asks the Corinthians to examine their own lives for evidence of salvation. Such evidence would include trust in Christ (Heb. 3:6), obedience to God (Matt. 7:21), growth in holiness (Heb. 12:14; 1 John 3:3), the fruit of the Spirit (Gal. 5:22, 23), love for other Christians (1 John 3:14), positive influence on others (Matt. 5:16), adhering to the apostolic teaching (1 John 4:2), and the testimony of the Holy Spirit within them (Rom. 8:15, 16)

The IVP New Testament Commentary Series notes:

The kind of testing Paul envisions is that which proves the worth or genuineness of something (dokimazo; compare 2 Cor 2:9; 8:8, 22; 9:13). In this case it is the Corinthians’ faith that is to be proven. Pistis in this context denotes profession. The Corinthians have professed a belief in Christ, but does their life match their profession? If the life of the congregation is not in conformity with the trutes of the gospel, it negates any claim to standing firm in the faith (1 Cor 16:13).

In the article at Daily Encouragement, Stephen and Brooksyne Weber began by comparing this to an energy audit they had of their house.  Then they write:

In his article “The Place Of Self-examination” by S. Lewis Johnson he comments concerning this verse, “There are literally millions of professing Christians who need to pay attention to this statement of the apostle. They have entered into a shallow commitment to Christianity, they’ve joined the church, they’ve been baptized or they’ve done other things that might make them think that they are genuine believers in the Lord Jesus Christ. They’ve been encouraged to think that, by men who’ve not been careful to point out that there is more to becoming a Christian than subscribing to a statement. They don’t hate sin. They don’t love holiness. They do not pray. They do not study the word of God. They do not walk humbly with God. These individuals, so many of them stand in the same danger in which the Corinthians stood. And the apostle’s words, “Test yourselves to see if you are in the faith, examine yourselves,” are valid words that each of us should ponder.”

Self-examination or a spiritual audit is important so that we correct ourselves on a regular basis to make certain we continue to bring glory to God in the manner in which we live our lives.

Colossians 1:10-12 provides a list of audit items for our consideration. I will phrase them as personal questions:

  • Am I living in a manner worthy of the Lord?
  • Am I pleasing Him in all respects?
  • Am I bearing fruit in every good work?
  • Am I increasing in the knowledge of God?
  • Am I being strengthened with all power, according to His glorious might?
  • Am I attaining steadfastness and patience?
  • Am I joyously giving thanks to the Father?

They also included another key verse that day:

“But let a man examine himself” (1 Corinthians 11:28a).

which is,

in the context of sharing Communion at the Lord’s Table. Before one eats and drinks of the emblems representing the broken Body and shed blood of Christ he is to examine himself. Of utmost importance in this personal exam is the answer to these foundational questions, “Do I have saving faith in Christ?” (Romans 10:8,9). “Do I have any unconfessed sin in my heart?” (1 John 1:9).

If your church has a monthly communion service, that’s coming up in a couple of weeks, but you don’t have to wait until then to perform a spiritual audit; a spiritual self examination.