Christianity 201

October 14, 2017

A Focused Mind vs. An Idle Mind

Filed under: Christianity - Devotions — paulthinkingoutloud @ 5:31 pm
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The title the author gave this piece was very practical and very specific. It’s not the usual type of devotional I choose here.

But the 2nd and 3rd paragraph were absolute gold! The difference between David as a teenager who was supremely confident and focused, as opposed to later in life when he is basically taking days off work to do nothing.

So again, if the title below doesn’t connect with you, read the piece anyway and notice the distinction in the introduction. The blog is MuyiwaWrites by Muyiwa Omosa and like other writers, the use of lower-case “i” is not a typo. Click the title below to read at source.

How Idle Moments May Be Feeding Your Porn Addiction

I can’t remember what led me to this part of the Bible, but i think i was curious to understand what made David so confident against Goliath? I wasn’t interested in just reading the verses that spoke about the fight, i wanted to understand the process. What made him this bold?

One of the verses that has still struck me to this day is in 1 Samuel 17:26. Goliath had come out to taunt the people of Israel yet again, and David who was should have been terrified as a teenager was busy negotiating the reward for killing this giant, even before the fight “David asked the soldiers standing nearby, what will a man get for killing this Philistine and ending his defiance of Israel?…”

It’s the equivalent of going for a job interview with a multinational company when you didn’t even finish high school, but instead of trying to sell yourself you are more interested in the benefits the job has to offer…it just blows my mind every time i read this.

Anyway, 1 Samuel was so interesting, i couldn’t stop so i continued on into 2 Samuel and came across this verse in chapter 11:1-2

(S)cripture: “In the spring of the year, when kings normally go out to war, David sent Joab and the Israelite army to fight the Ammonites. They destroyed the Ammonite army and laid siege to the city of Rabbah. However, David stayed behind in Jerusalem. Late one afternoon, after his midday rest, David got out of bed and was walking on the roof of the palace. As he looked out over the city, he noticed a woman of unusual beauty taking a bath

(O)bservations: The first thing i noticed was “when kings normally go out to war”. David was supposed to be at war with the army but chose to stay behind. A lot can happen when you are supposed to be somewhere but choose to be somewhere else.

When you don’t occupy your mind, you leave an open door for the enemy to fill that void. I believe this is how a lot of people get involved in porn addictions, drug abuse and so on.

David was walking on the roof when he should have been walking on the battle ground, he saw a naked woman taking a bath, when he should have been seeing strategies to defeat the enemy. This moment of idleness would eventually spiral into a series of unfortunate events that led to murder and so much more.

Imagine that, one moment of idleness led to murder…one moment of idleness led to impregnating another mans wife. The idle mind really is the devils workshop.

(A)pplication: A popular quote that i heard recently says “People find themselves in prisons, because they didn’t plan to be somewhere else”

Having a vision for my life has automatically defined the decisions i can make because i have already unconsciously defined the consequences of my actions way ahead of time.

For example, one of my goals in life is to heal other marriages through mine…i want my marriage to show the world that it can work if it is done God’s way. That image i have in my heart keeps me disciplined…that image would never be realised if i were to get involved in a scandal. It is very necessary to have a plan for your life…i wrote about some practical steps i took in painting this picture

Whatever you focus on, expands. Every morning when i wake up, i meditate…i look at my goals and read them out loud, i study the Bible so that my mind has something to chew on for the rest of the day.

I usually create a to-do list the night before so that my activities for the day are already set out to eliminate any idle moments as much as possible.

(P)rayer: Heavenly Father, i just ask for more hunger for You. The more i know You, the less idle i become. How can i even be idle when you are everywhere for me to see? When i look up in the skies You are right there, the car i drive came from the ground you made. Open my eyes to see you in everything i do. In Jesus Name!!! AMEN

October 7, 2015

The Wisdom of Margin

Today’s devotional thoughts by Alicia Bruxvoort are actually the second half of a longer piece which appeared at the devotional page of Proverbs 31 Ministries. This was a new website for us, and some of you might want to spend some time there, in which case click the title below to read the full post and then look around.

Those of you who are presently parenting children or have children in your care will especially appreciate this and may wish to read the longer version, and those of you who are past the parenting phase or never had kids will no doubt still understand the analogy.

 clock spiral
“Teach us to number our days so that we may truly live and achieve wisdom.” Psalm 90:12
(The Voice)

…In an attempt to give my kids opportunities to learn and grow, I’d packed our days with good things — art classes and swimming lessons, church programs and playgroups. But lately, even those good things had lost their glimmer. Our schedule was full, but my heart ached with emptiness.

When we arrived at the aquatic center, I settled on the edge of the pool to watch. The instructor stood in the water and beckoned Lizzy to swim to his side.

My daughter took a deep breath, dunked her head and kicked with all her might. At first she moved toward her teacher with impressive speed, but then she began to flail. Her torso sank and she yelped in fear.

The teacher lifted my trembling girl out of the water and held her steady. “Slow down,” he chided as Lizzy gulped for air. “You were moving so fast you forgot to breathe!”

The image of a fuzzy orange caterpillar flashed through my mind, and my stomach lurched with conviction. Though a haze of unsolicited tears blurred my vision, suddenly I could see clearly.

In the midst of all our hurry, I’d forgotten to leave time for our souls to breathe. We had no time for lingering on sidewalks or pausing to help a friend in need. We had no time for delighting in God’s Word or savoring a sunset. And in the words of a frenzied mom, we had no time for miracles!

Today’s key verse reminds us that life is a gift to use wisely. We’ve been created for more than just counting our days. We’ve been created to make our days count.

To merely tally time doesn’t require much forethought, but to truly live requires Spirit-inspired wisdom. Maybe that’s why the psalmist approaches God with a humble heart and implores, “Teach us to number our days …”

While the Bible doesn’t contain a template for perfect time management, this simple prayer reminds us that God alone knows the best rhythm for our lives. He knows how to direct our time without draining our souls. He knows how to establish our pace without hurting our hearts.

If we want to truly live, we must seek His vision as we set our schedules.

As we learn to number our days, we’ll have a margin for miracles … because you never know when you might stumble upon a fuzzy orange caterpillar just waiting to turn into a butterfly!

Dear Lord, teach me how to use my time so I can truly live! In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

TRUTH FOR TODAY:
Isaiah 52:12, “Go in confidence and grace — no rushing, no frantic escape. There’s no need to be anxious — the Eternal One goes before and behind you. The God of Israel paves the way with assurance and strength. He watches your back.” (The Voice)

Matthew 6:33, “Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and then all these things will be given to you too.” (The Voice)

RELATED RESOURCES:
If your schedule leaves no room for lingering over caterpillars, you might enjoy Taming the To-Do List: How to Choose Your Best Work Every Day. In it, author Glynnis Whitwer helps you manage an overloaded schedule, so you have time for what matters most.

Visit Alicia Bruxvoort’s blog for more encouragement.

REFLECT AND RESPOND:
Identify someone whose heart is hurting from hurry. Do something this week to lighten her load.

Have an honest conversation with the Lord about your schedule. Ask Him to help you align your agenda with His heart.

May 5, 2012

Spreading Your Abundance

Before you begin reading: What do you think the disciples did with the “12 baskets left over” when Jesus fed the 5,000? …

…Pentecostal monk (!) Jim Thomber’s blog is called Thinking Out Loud, which I think is rather great name for a blog!  This appeared a few weeks ago under the title, Nothing Is Wasted.

“After everyone was full, Jesus told his disciples, ‘Now gather the leftovers, so that nothing is wasted.’ So they picked up the pieces and filled twelve baskets with scraps left by the people” – John 6:13 (NLT)

In this very familiar passage – the only miracle that is mentioned in all four Gospels – Jesus fed 5,000 men, plus women and children, with five small, flat cakes of barley (the cheapest of grains) and two small fish (probably pickled fish served as hors d’oeuvres). After everyone had enough to eat, Jesus instructed the disciples to gather the leftovers, filling twelve large baskets, “so that nothing is wasted.”

This story is a great picture of our God who not only provides but also over-provides, and by doing so teaches us not to waste the over-the-top supply. This passage challenges me to ask, “What am I doing with my extras?” Specifically, what am I doing with my extra time, treasure and touch? And every person I know has extras in at least one of the areas, if not all.

Time – What do I do with my extra hours? Do I spend it working more so I can earn more? Do I use my extra time to watch more television? After the people ate and were satisfied, Jesus likely distributed the extra for the blessing of many. On the other hand, I like to picture twelve grown men marching behind a young boy and delivering the baskets to his family in Capernaum. Jesus produced the over-abundance but He shared the results. Am I using the blessing of my extra time to be a blessing to others, or am I finding extraordinary ways to waste it on myself?

Treasure – What am I doing with my extra money? After I’ve tithed, paid my bills and put a little away in savings, what am I doing with the rest? Am I spending it on what is not bread and laboring for stuff that does not satisfy (Isaiah 55:2)? Do I have to have that latest iPhone? Does it satisfy? Is the newest Wii game something my soul will delight in? Is it the richest of fare? Where my treasure is, there is my heart, also (Matthew 6:21). Do I pay more attention the bells and whistles of my latest gadget than I do to maintaining my relationship with my family? Do I know where the games apps is on my phone but don’t know where my child spent the night? If I’m quicker to get angry at someone who has scratched my car than someone who uses a racial slur, I’ve just shown my heart is with my stuff, even though God’s heart is with His people.

Touch – Am I stingy with my personal self? Do I have a limited amount of hugs and affection I can share with people? Do I seek out the people I want to be associated with and withdraw from the unlovely or unpopular? Am I cold with someone who has recently criticized me and overly enthusiastic towards someone who likes me? Do I coddle up to the rich man in church and compliment him on his new Mercedes Benz while giving monosyllabic answers to the poor man who smells of stale cigarettes?

When I look at my life, I can see waste in every area I’ve mentioned. But as I think about the twelve baskets of leftovers and how Jesus made sure they were picked up, I’m starting to have trouble with waste. I want God to show me creative ways of using my time, treasure and touch, and maybe some day He’ll choose me to bring a basket full of abundance to a family that needs it most.

~Jim Thomber


Here’s an unrelated bonus item for today, a classic contemporary Christian song, I Wish You Jesus by Scott Wesley Brown. This is from a rather obscure album, Songs and Stories, and is the concluding song Scott gives his audience. You can do no better than to wish someone Jesus. If you can’t see it here click this link.


Mission Statement: Christianity 201 is a melting-pot of devotional and Bible study content from across the widest range of the Christian blogosphere.  An individual article may be posted even if some or all readers might not agree with other things posted at the same blog, and two posts may follow on consecutive days by authors with very different doctrinal perspectives.  The Kingdom of God is so much bigger than the small portion of it we can see from our personal vantage point, and one of the purposes of C201 is to allow readers a ‘macro’ view of the many ministries and individual voices available for reading.

Scripture portions quoted at Christianity 201 are always in green because the Scriptures have LIFE!

October 12, 2011

A Closer Look at Jesus’ Daytimer

This is from Mark Buchanan’s book, The Rest of God

…The distinguishing mark of the purposeful is not time-management.

It’s that they notice.  They’re fully awake.  Jesus for example.  He lived life with the clearest and highest purpose.  Yet he veered and strayed from one interruption to the next with no apparent plan in hand other than his single overarching one: Get to Jerusalem and die.  Otherwise, his days as far as we can figure were a series of zigzags and detours, apparent whims and second thoughts, interruptions and delays, off the cuff plans, spur of the moment decisions, leisurely meals, serendipitous rounds of story telling…

  • who touched me?
  • you give them something to eat
  • let’s go to the other side

Jesus was available — or not — according to some oblique logic all his own. He had an inner ear for the Father’s whispers, a third eye for the Spirit’s motions. One minute he’s not going to the temple, the next he is. One minute he refuses to help a wedding host solve his wine drought, the next he’s all over it. He’s ready to drop everything and rush over to a complete stranger’s house to heal his servant but dawdles four days while Lazarus — “the one he loves” — writhes in his death throes or fails to come at all when John — “the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” — languishes on death row. The closest we get to what dictated Jesus’ schedule is his own statement in John’s gospel: “The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit.” (John 3: 8 NIV)

~Mark Buchanan

November 6, 2010

We Interrupt This Devotional —

I wish I had time to write original material everyday; but the process of discovering other Bible study and devotional bloggers is an adventure in itself.   Zach — today’s writer — pastors Concordia Lutheran Church in San Antonio, Texas.   This post appeared last week under the title:  Being Interrupted: A Lesson from Augustine.

I am most definitely a “Type A” personality.  I like to plan, organize, and execute – preferably in a deliberate, linear, and flawless manner.  Yet, as anyone who has walked this earth for more than a second knows, life does not always proceed in a deliberate and linear manner.  And it certainly does not proceed flawlessly!  Interruptions, accidents, and personal catastrophes make life an adventure in which you never know what the next chapter will bring.

Perhaps it is my penchant for planning that makes me appreciate so much this quote from Augustine:

But I am annoyed because of the demands that are thrust on me…arriving unannounced, from here, there, and everywhere.  They interrupt and hold up all other things that we have so neatly lined up in order.  They never seem to stop. (Peter Robert Lamont Brown, Augustine of Hippo:  A Biography, 468)

I can honestly say that I know how Augustine feels.  For when I get things “neatly lined up in order” and am then “interrupted,” I get “annoyed.”

But should I get annoyed?  I suppose a little bit of a human annoyance is inevitable.  And yet, I can’t help but remember the attitude of my Lord when He got interrupted:

Then Jesus took His disciples with Him and they withdrew by themselves to a town called Bethsaida, but the crowds learned about it and followed Him. He welcomed them and spoke to them about the kingdom of God, and healed those who needed healing. (Luke 9:10-11)

Jesus desires to withdraw His disciples to get a little bit of rest and relaxation with His disciples.  But then, He gets interrupted.  Crowds, eager to hear Him teach and have their ills healed, follow Him so that He cannot get a moment’s rest.  They arrive “unannounced from here, there, and everywhere.”  They interrupt Him.

How does Jesus respond to this crowd’s insensitive interruption?  He welcomes them (cf. verse 11).  The Greek word for “welcomed” is apadechomai, meaning, “to accept,” or “to receive.”  Interestingly, this word is sometimes used to describe the forgiveness of sins (e.g. Genesis 50:17 LXX).  Thus, Jesus welcomes the crowd, and in His welcome, there is forgiveness.  And this too is our hope:  That in Christ, we are welcomed in spite of sin because we are forgiven of our sin.

Augustine pens his candid admission of being annoyed by interruptions as he is trying to write his greatest work, The City of God. And so it is understandable that, while working on such a weighty tome, he would be annoyed by the delays.  After all, his task is vital!  But so are his interruptions.  For a man named Vincentius Victor is interrupting Augustine, questioning him on his view of man’s soul.  And a man’s soul is a big deal – not only as the subject of theological debate, but in the eyes of God.  And so, Augustine takes a break from his work on The City of God to answer Victor.

Like Jesus, do we welcome those who interrupt us?  Yes, what we are working on at the time may be important, but the interruption may be just as important.  Moreover, how do we respond to interruptions?  With annoyance in our hearts or with the welcoming spirit of our Lord?  Although interruptions are bound to annoy us, especially if you’re a “Type A” personality like me, it is worth it to see some interruptions not simply as glitches in your plans, but as divine appointments for your soul.  So welcome an interruption today!  After all, the interruption may just be the most important – and even the best – part of your day.