Christianity 201

June 22, 2015

Remembering God’s Law, God’s Provision, God’s Mercy

Yesterday we looked at the topic of different things that can be used to remind us God’s faithfulness to us. Things like special places, memorial stones, etc. are permitted, but not if they become idols, that is not if they become objects of worship. One special reminder that Israel carried with everywhere they went was the Ark of the Covenant. To the best of my knowledge, we haven’t dealt with that here recently, so let’s dive in.

From the website, GotQuestions.com:

God made a covenant (a conditional covenant) with the children of Israel through His servant Moses. He promised good to them and their children for generations if they obeyed Him and His laws; but He always warned of despair, punishment, and dispersion if they were to disobey. As a sign of His covenant He had the Israelites make a box according to His own design, in which to place the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments. This box, or chest, was called an “ark” and was made of acacia wood overlaid with gold. The Ark was to be housed in the inner sanctum of the tabernacle in the desert and eventually in the Temple when it was built in Jerusalem. This chest is known as the Ark of the Covenant.

The real significance of the Ark of the Covenant was what took place involving the lid of the box, known as the “Mercy Seat.” The term ‘mercy seat’ comes from a Hebrew word meaning “to cover, placate, appease, cleanse, cancel or make atonement for.” It was here that the high priest, only once a year (Leviticus 16), entered the Holy of Holies where the Ark was kept and atoned for his sins and the sins of the Israelites. The priest sprinkled blood of a sacrificed animal onto the Mercy Seat to appease the wrath and anger of God for past sins committed. This was the only place in the world where this atonement could take place.

The Mercy Seat on the Ark was a symbolic foreshadowing of the ultimate sacrifice for all sin—the blood of Christ shed on the cross for the remission of sins. The Apostle Paul, a former Pharisee and one familiar with the Old Testament, knew this concept quite well when he wrote about Christ being our covering for sin in Romans 3:24-25: “…and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith.” Just as there was only one place for atonement of sins in the Old Testament—the Mercy Seat of the Ark of the Covenant—so there is also only one place for atonement in the New Testament and current times—the cross of Jesus Christ. As Christians, we no longer look to the Ark but to the Lord Jesus Himself as the propitiation and atonement for our sins.

From the Apologetics website, Tekton:

1 Kings 8:9 There was nothing in the ark save the two tables of stone, which Moses put there at Horeb, when the LORD made a covenant with the children of Israel, when they came out of the land of Egypt.

Heb. 9:4 Which had the golden censer, and the ark of the covenant overlaid round about with gold, wherein was the golden pot that had manna, and Aaron’s rod that budded, and the tables of the covenant…

Contradiction? No. Kings and Chronicles refer to a time after Solomon. Hebrews refers to a time just after Israel left Egypt and when the Ark was first made. That’s a span of almost 500 years. Do you think the manna and the rod were still fresh? No, they were organic materials and would have crumbled away long since.

Some have noted that nothing in Exodus states that the rod or manna were put in the Ark. This is true; that they were there was an extrapolation of the rabbis and other Jewish writers based on Ex. 25:16, “And thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee.” The gold jar tradition is testified to by Philo. One would have to assume that sometime in that 500 years, the jar was lost or removed, which does not seem unlikely given the loss of thousands of other artifacts through time.

Objection: The rod of Aaron would no more have rotted than the wooden portions of the ark itself.

It’s one thing to repair the tabernacle or the ark, and another thing to replace the rod of Aaron with a fresh substitute. The gold jar, admittedly, would not have rotted as would its contents. The jar’s value as a relic would be severely (totally?) reduced by the absence of supernatural contents. It is reasonable to suppose that the jar was set to a different purpose after the manna had been reduced to dust, or that the jar was taken in mischief.

The special status of the ark would have prevented any rearrangement of its contents.

Let us not neglect dealing with periods in Israel’s history (as in Judges) where Israel was occupied by invaders if not possessed by apostate leadership. We are not able to assume that the Levites were able to keep the ark completely safe and secure throughout the aforementioned 500 years (even as the fact that we have no idea where it is NOW speaks against this).

What about the fact that any non-Levite/non-Kohathite who improperly handled or looked on the ark would be instantly struck down by God?

Even assuming that the prohibitions associated with the death penalty were absolute rather than at God’s discretion, what would prevent heathens from seizing the poles and tipping the ark’s contents out?

Later Update: A reader has pointed out that Exodus 16:31-35 also implicitly indicates that the ark contained both the rod and the manna, particularly v. 34: “As the Lord commanded Moses, Aaron put the manna with the tablets of the covenant law, so that it might be preserved.” While this is not explicit, it does fit a natural assumption that they went together in the ark.

Hopefully that gets you started.

Go Deeper: For a further exhaustive study, including many scripture references, check out the Ark page on Bible.org

 

September 24, 2012

Keeping the Contract

Today’s thoughts are from A Year With God: Daily Readings and Reflections on God’s Own Words, by R. P. Nettlehorst, published in 2010 by Thomas Nelson. (Also available is A Year With Jesus: Daily Readings and Reflections on Jesus’ Own Words.) This entry, number 169, is part of a section titled “Loyalty and Betrayal” and is titled “What the Contract Stipulates.”

CEV Jer. 11: 1-3 The Lord God told me to say to the people of Judah and Jerusalem:

I, the Lord, am warning you that I will put a curse on anyone who doesn’t keep the agreement I made with Israel. So pay attention to what it says. My commands haven’t changed since I brought your ancestors out of Egypt, a nation that seemed like a blazing furnace where iron ore is melted. I told your ancestors that if they obeyed my commands, I would be their God, and they would be my people. Then I did what I had promised and gave them this wonderful land, where you now live.

“Yes, Lord,” I replied, “that’s true.”

 

People change their minds. They make promises, but then circumstances arise and they find it easy to alter the agreement. They had good intentions, but how were they to know what would happen?

The prophets were not innovators. They did not bring a new message from God. Instead, they preached the old story, repeating what God expected: his people would love him and love one another.

The book of Deuteronomy contained the formal agreement between God and Israel. The outline and structure of Deuteronomy matched the ancient treaties of the era. Such treaties were usually made as a consequence of war, when one nation defeated another in battle. In the Israelites’ case, however, they had been rescued rather than beaten.

Such ancient treaties began with a summary of recent events that explained the reason for the treaty. Following that were regulations that governed the relationship between two nations. Then the treaty listed all the benefits that would come if the agreements were properly kept, followed by the horrible curses that would befall those who dared violate the terms of the agreement. Finally witnesses were called upon to confirm the treaty.

Israel had agreed to that treaty with God in the time of Moses. They promised to do whatever God said. They had not been forced under duress to agree to the contract. He rescued them from Egypt before he offered it to them They were out of danger. And that was when they had decided to agree to the contract.

God reminded his people that he had not changed.They were comforted to know that God does what he promises.