Christianity 201

May 17, 2020

God: “Do you doubt Me? Just watch—you’ll see!”

This is our first time with Steve at the blog Journey in the Word. This is part of Israel’s “Manna” saga some of you might not remember. As I was posting this, I realized there was a song written about this passage by Michael Blanchard, originally recorded by Noel Paul Stookey, but then (below) found a more recent recording of it.

As always, please support the various writers we borrow from by reading their material at their sites. Click the header which follows.

Give me the Bread, Jesus!

“Normal”, “the way it was”, so many want it “the way it used to be!” I don’t blame people for that desire, so many things that I would like to be opened up, during this COVID-19 time of life. I MISS spending time with people in person. Miss our church and small group, with be physically in the same location. Technology, and zooming is great, but not the same. I can’t forget that no matter what happens, God is still with me, nothing can be more important.

Reading in Numbers 11 this morning, it was not one of the Israelite’s best days. Crying, whining, griping, weeping, were some of the words used in different translations. Why, they wanted things back to “normal”, “the way it was”, “the way it used to be,” back in Egypt, back in bondage as slaves. Wilderness life was no “piece of cake” (Well, actually they were making “cakes” out of manna, the “bread” from heaven.), they didn’t like the uncertainty of things, didn’t like not having fish, cucumbers, melons,……. They weren’t fans of needing to depend on God who didn’t work on the same time frame and agenda that they were accustomed to. Needless to say, but more than a few died that day, and then they got more quail meat than they bargained for. Read Numbers 11 for the full account.

We didn’t see the best of Moses that day, either. To the LORD, he says, “Why are you so hard on me? I am your devoted servant. Why don’t You look on me with affection?”

I don’t want to write down all the whining, but right before God replied to him he said this, “If You care about me at all, put me out of my misery so I do not have to live out this distress.” – The Voice

The LORD goes on to provide help for Moses with 70 other leaders, and then tells Moses how he is going to feed the people with meat. Yes, Moses is no different than many of us, yes, he questions how God can feed that many people. No lightning didn’t strike His servant, Moses. The Eternal One says, “Do you doubt Me? Do you question My power, that I can do what I’ve said? Just watch—you’ll see what will happen.” – The Voice

I love how some other versions put what God said, “Is the arm of the LORD too short?” The obvious answer is, NO!

Leaders had the Spirit laid on them, they prophesied, and then the quail began to fall, and fall, and fall. The rest is not a pretty sight, God’s judgment came down on many for their unbelief.

What did God impress upon me?

1. His presence is more important than anything! Give me Jesus! Leave bondage behind (that is, what anything without Jesus is!). Give me Jesus, keep your normal.

2. God’s arm is still not too short! He is more than able to provide.

3. Yes, that means He can use you and me. (He placed His Spirit on more than just Moses, He intends to use all of us, not just “pastors”, or “elders”,…)

4. I am not going to ask for meat! I guess that isn’t on my mind since I am eating solely “plant based” now. So, I guess I choose not to whine, cry, gripe, weep, when something is missing from my life that I used to have, but rather thank Him for His presence, and choose to love others with the bread I will always have, the Bread of Life, Jesus.

5. What “bondage” do I hang on to, keep turning back to? Is there repentance needed?

We all need to take inventory in our life, not looking so much at the things we have lost, but what is eternal that we possess. Thank God for the Eternal One within when we are in Christ.

So thankful His Arm and Hands reached me! Ephesians 2:1-10

I pray that you know His touch, His provision of life. John 3:16, Romans 5:8-10, Titus 3:5-6

Will we be like Peter, and desire that before we die (virus or no virus), make sure others remember these truths?

2 Peter 1:15 And I will make every effort to see that after my departure you will always be able to remember these things. – NIV

Who needs to hear words of truth and comfort?

Will we speak the truth in love?


Read more: Here’s another recent article from Journey in the Word, also from the Book of Numbers: Cloud Watching.


Song: Then the Quail Came – Peter Campbell

 

July 20, 2014

Murmuring and Complaining

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Today’s devotion was sourced at Christian Blessings, where they in turn “borrowed” it from the Institute for Christian Research.

Murmurers and Complainers
These people are grumblers and complainers, living only to satisfy their desires. They brag loudly about themselves, and they flatter others to get what they want.
(Jude 1:16)

Jude’s book cites several incidents in the early history of Israel right after they were wonderfully delivered from slavery in Egypt. Within a very short time, they had come through the Red Sea, had bitter water made sweet, seen water come out of a rock, and been fed with “angels’ food” from heaven. Yet when the 12 spies came back from the land of Canaan that had been promised to them, there was a widespread revolt against God and against Moses’ leadership.

The ten spies who “murmured” against God “died by the plague before the LORD” (Numbers 14:37). Some who had previously sided with the defeatist words of the spies tried to take matters into their own hands and “presumed to go up” to fight against the Canaanites and were killed or scattered (Numbers 14:44-45).

Much of the history of Israel is marked by various ways of turning away from God. Psalm 81 provides a good summary of how God sees this behavior: “I am the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt: open thy mouth wide, and I will fill it. But my people would not hearken to my voice; and Israel would none of me. So I gave them up unto their own hearts’ lust: and they walked in their own counsels” (Psalm 81:10-12).

Jude uses a rather unusual word picture to describe those who use others for their personal advantage. They speak “great swelling words” to gain the association. The Greek word is huperogkos, which conveys something like “beyond weight” or “too heavy.” The words are coming from hearts that are lustful and attempting to manipulate others for their own benefit. It appears that those who “murmur” and “complain” will use “heavy” words to achieve their ends. HMM III

From Institute for Creation Research

October 6, 2013

Did I Say That Out Loud?

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Speak No Evil

Yesterday, just before we closed, we included a link to a related post by Dianne Guthmuller. Today, I want to feature her writing here. This topic seems to come around here rather frequently; maybe God is trying to tell us something!  It appeared at her blog under the title Pass Me The Duct Tape. You’re encouraged to click through and discover other excellent articles on her blog, which is a daily Bible study similar to what we do here.

Today’s Scripture Reading:  Luke 8:1-3, Mark 3:20-230, Matthew 12:22-45, Mark 3:31-35, Matthew 12:46-50, Luke 8:19-21, Mark 4:1-9, Matthew 13:1-9, Luke 8:4-8, Mark 4:10-20

And I tell you this, you must give an account on judgment day for every idle word you speak.  The words you say will either acquit you or condemn you. Matthew 12:36-37

Every idle word…

Lord help me!  I’m in trouble.  Where’s the duct tape?

I looked up the word “idle” in Word Studies in the New Testament hoping for a reprieve, but none was to be found…

Idle (ἀργὸν). The word is compounded of ἀ, not, and ἔργον, work. An idle word is a nonworking word; an inoperative word. It has no legitimate work, no office, no business, but is morally useless and unprofitable.

Friends, Jesus wasn’t just talking about profanity, He was talking about gossip, criticism, whining, complaining, etc; anything that isn’t adding value to people’s lives.

Let’s look at the context in which this verse is written (Matthew 12:22-37).

Jesus was getting it from all sides:

  • The crowds were following Him everywhere; He couldn’t get enough time to Himself to grab a bite to eat
  • His family was trying to pull Him away from the crowds saying, “He’s out of his mind”
  • The teachers of religious law were saying He was possessed by Satan

When the teachers accused Jesus of being possessed by Satan He took great offense, not because they were doubting Him, but because they were speaking against the supernatural power of the Holy Spirit; which the religious leaders should have recognized.  Jesus gave a timeless warning that had grave consequences against speaking against the power of the Holy Spirit.

It was in this serious setting that Jesus warned us about idle words.  He prefaced His warning with a word picture, which was the common way to communicate in Jewish culture.

A tree is identified by its fruit.  If a tree is good, its fruit will be good. If a tree is bad, its fruit will be bad. –Matthew 12:33

If our heart is good our words will be good.  If our heart is bad our words will be bad.

In Jesus’ day the only words they dealt with were spoken words; very few people could write. Fast forward 2,000 years…how many words to you speak, write, type, or text in a 24 hour period?

Before you run to the garage and get your duct tape, remember Jesus sees and know our heart, so even if we keep our “idle” words from coming out, we’re still accountable for them.

What can we do about our idle words?

Don’t focus on the words…

Focus on getting your heart tuned into the Holy Spirit; ask Him to create in you a clean heart (Psalm 51:10) and your words will follow.

Heavenly Father, we want our words and our heart to be pleasing to You.  Lord, You made us, You know our human failings. Please forgive us when we fail; speak loudly to us when we do.  We say with David, create in us a clean heart.  Jesus, make us like You!

In Your Holy Name.  Amen and Amen!

March 28, 2011

A Sure Cure for Complaining

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From Our Journey devotional

This reading by Nancy Leigh DeMoss

True story:  A church group from New Bern, North Carolina, had traveled to the Caribbean on a mission trip.   During this particular trip, their host took them to visit a leper colony on the island of Tobago.   While there, they held a worship service in the campus chapel.   As you can imagine, the sight of emaciated lepers filing into their seats on the bare pews bore deeply into the minds and memories of each visitor to this unaccustomed scene.

But no memory left its mark like this one:

When the pastor announced, “We have time for one more hymn.  Does anyone have a favorite?” he noticed a lone patient seated awkwardly on the back row, facing away from the front.   At this final call for hymn requests, with great effort, the woman slowly turned her body in the pastor’s direction.

“Body” would perhaps be a generous description of what remained of hers.  No nose.  No lips.  Just bare teeth, askew within a chalky skull.  She raised her bony nub of an arm (no hand) to see if she might be called on to appeal for her favorite song to be sung.   Her teeth moved to the croaky rhythm of her voice as she said, “Could we sing, ‘Count Your Many Blessings‘?”

The pastor stumbled out of the pulpit, out the door, and into the adjoining yard, tears of holy conviction raining down on his face.   One of the traveling party rushed to fill his place, arguably the most “unblessed” of any spot in the universe.

A friend hustled outside, put his arm around the sobbing pastor, and consolingly said, “I’ll bet you’ll never be able to sing that song again, will you?”

“Yeah, I’ll sing it,” the pastor answered, “but never the same way, ever again.”

Leave it to a grotesquely deformed leper to remind us that grateful people are characterized by grateful words, while ungrateful people are giving to griping, complaining, murmuring, whining.

Some grumble at why God put thorns on roses, while others wisely notice — with awe and gratitude — that God has put roses among thorns.   Hear what people are saying when they talk about the everyday events of their lives, and you’ll see in an instant the difference between gratitude and ingratitude.

“You are my God and I will give thanks to you; you are my God; I will extol you.  Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever.”

Ps. 118: 28-29 ESV