Christianity 201

September 10, 2021

An Anniversary: A Time to Remember

Thinking about the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack in the United States got me wondering what we posted ten years ago on the 10th anniversary. Here’s what we talked about that day.

September 11, 2011

Seen enough of the TV specials? Tired of hearing of “9/11?” You should know there’s a good reason why we need those programs and magazine features and internet tributes:

People Tend to Forget

Jesus understood this. Scripture tells us that on the night he was betrayed he took bread and broke it and said, “This is my body, broken for you; this do in remembrance of me.”

But you already know that. Those words from I Cor. 11 are often the most-repeated words in most churches during the course of a church calendar year. “For I received from the Lord that which also I delivered unto you;” is somewhat how I think the KJV renders it. The section from verse 23 to approx. verse 30 forms what is called “The Words of Institution” for the communion service aka Lord’s Supper aka the Eucharist. Even if you attend a church where things are decidedly non-liturgical, these verses probably get read each time your church observes “the breaking of bread;” and even if your pastor leans toward the New Living Translation or The Message, it’s possible that he lapses into King James for this one.

Why did Jesus institute this New Covenant, Second Testament version of the Passover meal?

Because people tend to forget.

Want proof?

Let’s look at the section we almost never read when we gather around the communion table, Luke 22. In verse 19 and 20 he tells them to remember. He tells them his life is about to be poured out for them. What a solemn moment. A holy moment. But unfortunately, a very brief moment.

In verse 24, Luke makes it clear that he’s trying to capture an accurate picture of what happened that night. Even if it makes the disciples look bad. It’s the kind of stuff that you would never include in your report to Theophilus if you were merely trying to make Christianity look good. If you were writing propaganda.

24 A dispute also arose among them as to which of them was considered to be greatest.

I don’t want to be disrespectful here, but Luke might as well have written, “At this point, one of the disciples looked out the window of the upper room and announced, ‘Guys, you gotta come here for a minute; there’s a girl out there that is totally hot.’”

I’m serious. It’s that much out of place with what’s just happened. Jesus is telling them — trying to tell them — all that he is about to suffer in order that a plan laid out from before the foundations of the world will be fulfilled. And they’re arguing about who is Disciple of the Month. How could they go from one extreme to the other so quickly? In a matter of seconds?

Easily.

People tend to forget.

Whether it’s what happened in New York City, Washington, and that Pennsylvania field ten years ago; or whether it’s what happened in Roman occupied territory in the middle east two thousand years ago; we need to continually rehearse these stories in our hearts and pass them on to our children.

This is a day that is about remembering and like the upper room disciples, we can get so totally distracted. September 12th comes and everyone moves on to the next topic or news story. We must not let ourselves lose focus so easily. We must not forget.

Deuteronomy 4:9
Only be careful, and watch yourselves closely so that you do not forget the things your eyes have seen or let them fade from your heart as long as you live. Teach them to your children and to their children after them.

Tomorrow, in another flashback to an earlier post here at C201, we’ll look at the idea of creating memorials to remember times of both hardship and blessing in our lives.


Read more about the cross at Ground Zero in this special-edition article we ran in August, 2011.

September 11, 2020

Forgiving the Unforgivable

Filed under: Christianity - Devotions — paulthinkingoutloud @ 5:31 pm
Tags: ,

Next year will mark the 20th anniversary of the September 11th attacks in the United States, which means today marks 19 years.

The Lectionary readings for this Sunday include Matthew 18:21-35

Then Peter came to Jesus and asked, “Lord, how many times shall I forgive my brother or sister who sins against me? Up to seven times?”

Jesus answered, “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times. “Therefore, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

and with that, Jesus launches into a story I trust is familiar to all of us. (If not, click this link.)

Occasionally I run into blogs that consist of pastors’ sermon notes involving churches that use the Lectionary as a guide to preaching. Instead of the pastor selecting a text on his or her own, there are three or four prescribed readings for each Sunday, usually consisting an Old Testament reading, a Psalm , a selection from the gospels, and an excerpt from an Epistle.  One of the texts is required to form the basis of the weekend sermon.

We’re returning today to the blog ForeWords written by Rich Brown.  Although he is not currently writing, I went back to 2017 to see what he’d written when this text appeared for a Sunday that year which also followed a 9/11 anniversary. Click the title below to read this at source.

Forgive Each Other

His disciples asked Jesus just how often they should/must forgive a brother or sister. In response Jesus gave them a number: either 77 or seven times 70, depending on the Bible translation you’re reading. In either case, it means pretty much the same thing: Never stop forgiving!

Jesus goes on to share a parable. Unlike many of his others, this parable is clear, understandable, and obvious. Maybe Jesus thought this topic was so important, so critical to the functioning of his kingdom that he didn’t want even the most dim-witted of his inner circle to misunderstand. In its own way it’s a commentary on the lines from the Lord’s Prayer: “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.”

As part of a philosophical discussion this instruction is so evident in its meaning and purpose that it almost requires no further thought. Yet when we move from the realm of the theoretical to the actual, well, there’s the rub.

Of all the Sundays when the Lectionary focuses on forgiveness, what an interesting coincidence that this year it falls on the Sunday after the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York, Washington, and the plane that crashed in western Pennsylvania.

Whoa, most of us probably immediately think: How is it even conceivable to contemplate this topic near September 11th? One way out, of course, is to zoom in on the idea that Jesus told his disciples they were to forgive members of their own faith community (brothers/sisters, church, or however else that Greek word is translated), so this situation doesn’t apply. That feels like a cop-out to me.

Although it’s been more than a decade and a half (and consider what those years have brought, with war and economic catastrophe just for starters–plus record-shattering natural disasters with floods, earthquakes, and wildfires), those of us who lived through that day and the ones immediately following it have little trouble being transported back. The media replays those towers burning and crashing, people screaming and running and, soon, scouring the streets of New York City with posters of their missing loved ones.

The United States went to war in Afghanistan and Iraq (and wherever else the so-called “War on Terror” took it), which led to tens of thousands of other deaths, and easily dramatic changes in life and lifestyle to millions more. There’s Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo and, eventually, Navy Seal Team 6 taking out Osama bin Laden on the direct orders of the President. We’ve changed presidencies from Bush 2 to Obama to Trump, yet the terrorists atacks and wars in the middle east go on. [Editor’s note: Since this was written we could add political polarization, racial tension and COVID-19.]

With all that not just in the background but in our faces, how can we possibly talk about forgiveness? Isn’t it too soon, too powerful, too sensitive, too whatever?

Someone once said that evil can imagine only itself. Righteousness, however, can imagine both good and evil. Forgiveness isn’t a feeling; it’s a decision–and a process at that.

And so the formula becomes Remember, Forgive, Repeat.

I recall reading the comments of someone whose loved one had died in the Twin Towers on 9/11. She wrote that every September as this anniversary rolls around it’s as if she has to live through her loved-one’s memorial service all over again. The pain and grief come rushing back. But she hopes, somehow, that each ensuing anniversary will bring some kind of closure to that, and that from that point on she can start replacing the pain of the past with hope for the future. I pray she can–and that so many others personally touched by 9/11 can do the same.


September 11, 2011

A Day Set Aside to Remember

September 11, 2011

Seen enough of the TV specials? Tired of hearing of “9/11?” You should know there’s a good reason why we need those programs and magazine features and internet tributes:

People Tend to Forget

Jesus understood this. Scripture tells us that on the night he was betrayed he took bread and broke it and said, “This is my body, broken for you; this do in remembrance of me.”

But you already know that. Those words from I Cor. 11 are often the most-repeated words in most churches during the course of a church calendar year. “For I received from the Lord that which also I delivered unto you;” is somewhat how I think the KJV renders it. The section from verse 23 to approx. verse 30 forms what is called “The Words of Institution” for the communion service aka Lord’s Supper aka the Eucharist. Even if you attend a church where things are decidedly non-liturgical, these verses probably get read each time your church observes “the breaking of bread;” and even if your pastor leans toward the New Living Translation or The Message, it’s possible that he lapses into King James for this one.

Why did Jesus institute this New Covenant, Second Testament version of the Passover meal?

Because people tend to forget.

Want proof?

Let’s look at the section we almost never read when we gather around the communion table, Luke 22. In verse 19 and 20 he tells them to remember. He tells them his life is about to be poured out for them. What a solemn moment. A holy moment. But unfortunately, a very brief moment.

In verse 24, Luke makes it clear that he’s trying to capture an accurate picture of what happened that night. Even if it makes the disciples look bad. It’s the kind of stuff that you would never include in your report to Theophilus if you were merely trying to make Christianity look good. If you were writing propaganda.

24 A dispute also arose among them as to which of them was considered to be greatest.

I don’t want to be disrespectful here, but Luke might as well have written, “At this point, one of the disciples looked out the window of the upper room and announced, ‘Guys, you gotta come here for a minute; there’s a girl out there that is totally hot.'”

I’m serious. It’s that much out of place with what’s just happened. Jesus is telling them — trying to tell them — all that he is about to suffer in order that a plan laid out from before the foundations of the world will be fulfilled. And they’re arguing about who is Disciple of the Month. How could they go from one extreme to the other so quickly? In a matter of seconds?

Easily. People tend to forget.

Whether it’s what happened in New York City, Washington, and that Pennsylvania field ten years ago; or whether it’s what happened in Roman occupied territory in the middle east two thousand years ago; we need to continually rehearse these stories in our hearts and pass them on to our children.

This is a day that is about remembering and like the upper room disciples, we can get so totally distracted. September 12th comes and everyone moves on to the next topic or news story. We must not let ourselves lose focus so easily. We must not forget.

Deuteronomy 4:9
Only be careful, and watch yourselves closely so that you do not forget the things your eyes have seen or let them fade from your heart as long as you live. Teach them to your children and to their children after them.