Christianity 201

December 11, 2019

The Early Christian Writings Bring Hope

Filed under: Christianity - Devotions — paulthinkingoutloud @ 5:35 pm
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I was surprised yesterday when one of the devotionals I subscribe to included a brief excerpt from The New Testament in Its World by N.T. Wright and Michael Bird. Taking a course with N.T. Wright this summer, I am beginning to form a much clearer picture of the context in which the gospels and epistles were written.

The New Testament in Its World:An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians (Zondervan) is a rather large book (992 pages) which probably exceeds the price range of many readers here. But I thought I’d bring you an excerpt of the excerpt.

Receiving Hope and Sharing Hope

by N. T. Wright and Michael F. Bird
from The New Testament in Its World

May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you the same attitude of mind toward each other that Christ Jesus had, so that with one mind and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God…
 
May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in Him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.Romans 15:5-7, Romans 15:13

The purpose of Scripture, Paul says in Romans 15:4, is so that “we might have hope.” He was speaking, of course, of Israel’s scriptures [the Old Testament], but with hindsight the same applies to the early Christian writings [the New Testament].

If that is so, then a prominent purpose of New Testament study ought to be to explain and illuminate the substance of that hope. In fact, we could even say that the mission of the Church is to share and reflect the future hope as the New Testament presents it.

Hope is, in fact, the foundation for the daily workings of a church.

Where the Church Can Spread Hope

Faithful Christian ministry will often take Jesus’ followers to places where hope is in short supply:

  • places where a sense of hopelessness hangs over a community
  • where the effects of global financial chaos are still in effect
  • where there is unemployment and family breakdown
  • where refugees feel alienated and despised in their adopted homes
  • where racial injustice is regarded as a kind of ugly normality that we have to put up with, and xenophobia is part of normal political rhetoric

We are called to work with, and for:

  • people who are one illness away from financial ruin
  • people who fear for their children’s safety when walking down the street
  • people who find that cultural elites mock and attack them because they do not signal “progressive virtues”
  • communities where politics means partisan policies on the one hand and acute apathy on the other
  • a world in which, while all this is going on, the rich keep getting richer and the poor keep getting poorer

To such places, and the sad people who live in them, as well as to those who find themselves battered by circumstances beyond their control, the message of Jesus and His death and resurrection comes as good news from a far country, news of surprising hope.

The Church, in the power of the Spirit, must signal in its life and teaching that there is:

  • more to being human than mere survival
  • more than hedonism and power
  • more than ambition and entertainment

Life… does have purpose; there is comfort for those weighed down by moral injury; narcissism is not the true “normal;” there is something more powerful than economics and bombs.

There really is a different way to be human, and it has been decisively launched with Jesus.

In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world. John 16:33

 

3 Comments »

  1. Can this class be taken on line or remotely?

    Comment by James McHarry — February 2, 2020 @ 8:41 pm | Reply

    • There’s a set of video lectures available for $50 USD and a curriculum package available from $133 USD. Contact anyone who sells Christian books. If you’re outside the US or Canada, the videos won’t work on standard DVD players.

      Comment by paulthinkingoutloud — February 2, 2020 @ 9:02 pm | Reply

    • It occurs to me now you may be referencing the course my wife and I took in the summer that I mentioned in the introduction. I don’t know about its online availability, but you could contact Regent College in Vancouver to see if it is listed.

      Comment by paulthinkingoutloud — February 2, 2020 @ 9:09 pm | Reply


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