Christianity 201

May 29, 2011

Church: On the Other Hand…

Sometimes when we’re reading Christian blogs, we try to read between the lines to figure out where the writer stands on various issues.  If you read this blog and its companion, Thinking out Loud, over the past few weeks, there have been a couple of references to the house church or organic church or simple church movement, as well as an article about how we can get so addicted to all things church that we can miss Jesus; so it would be easy to assume that I’m a bit soft on the whole brick and mortar church thing.

But that would be a mistake.  This week I attended two different morning services and later today I’ll watch two different online church services which are rebroadcasts of brick and mortar church gatherings.  I’m the biggest cheerleader I know of in my local area for what local churches are doing. 

This morning I was reminded of this verse in John 2, which falls at the end of the passage where Jesus clears the temple (the first time) and possible where we get the expression, “Now the tables are turned.”

NIV John2:17 His disciples remembered that it is written: “Zeal for your house will consume me.”

The NLT has it as “passion” while the New Century Version uses “strong love.”  The quote is from Psalm 69:9 —

NIV Ps.69:9 for zeal for your house consumes me,
   and the insults of those who insult you fall on me.

— which is interesting because it equates zeal for God’s “house” with the seriousness of those who insult God Himself.

Living in Canada, which is nearly 50% nominally Roman Catholic, we’re familiar with the French language which uses “tabernacle” as a swear word.  It’s a rather grievous term, as is any unnecessary mention of God (the French say Mon Dieu) or Jesus, but it betrays its origins in a great respect for the building in which worship is conducted.

Today, many of our church buildings are multi-purpose structures used for a variety of weekly events; having community-friendly or seeker-friendly auditoriums — the word ‘sanctuary’ is no longer in vogue — which are free of crosses or other religious icons or symbols.  People show up in jeans or shorts and t-shirts and are often seen drinking coffee during the songs and sermon, while the kids go running wild before and after the service starts.  It’s hard to imagine that being seen as worthy of generating a swear word!

Maybe those things are externals, and are less important now than they were a couple of generations back because we see those things as superficial when it comes to defining deep faith.  I’m not sure.  But I do think we need to rediscover the Psalm 69/John 2 verse, which the NASB takes a step further, quoting the Psalms passage in John in capital letters:

17 His disciples remembered that it was written, “ZEAL FOR YOUR HOUSE WILL CONSUME ME.”

~Paul Wilkinson

1 Comment »

  1. As an old timer I have often found myself in two minds over this issue. Part of me says we wear our “Sunday best” to attend a Church service and the other part of me sees how this sets us apart (in an unwelcome way) from “outsiders” who would feel out of place. I think of the old argument of how we would dress and behave if we were to be invited to meet the Queen, but I’m not sure it really applies.

    I have been in services where “beach clothes” (cargo pants/shorts, tee shirt, thongs) are worn by most of the men and some of the women dress better to go shopping. By the same token, the “worship atmosphere” and the Bible teaching in that Church was tops.

    I think of another old argument. If we can get excited, passionate, zealous about a football match, why can’t we show the same for our faith and all connected with it. God set extreme rules regarding worship in the Old Testament and while we now have a new and living way, with immediate access, surely the ATTITUDE should be the same. We SHOULD be passionate our our faith, our worship, and even our Church building. It stands as a silent witness to the community

    Comment by meetingintheclouds — June 1, 2011 @ 4:16 pm | Reply


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